'Dew won't be an issue in India-Bangladesh Day-Night Test'

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'Dew won't be an issue in India-Bangladesh Day-Night Test'

'Dew won't be an issue in India-Bangladesh Day-Night Test'

IANS   ¦    Oct 30, 2019 12:01:16 PM (IST)

\'Dew won\'t be an issue in India-Bangladesh Day-Night Test\'-1Kolkata: India's first-ever Day-Night Test, slated to be played against Bangladesh at the Eden Gardens, is likely to have an early start which will eliminate the dew factor to a considerable degree, said local curator Sujan Mukherjee.

The experienced campaigner also said that the wicket will be a sporting one like it has been at the relaid Eden Gardens square for the past few years.

As per the Eden curator, the historic match will start between 1 p.m. and 1 p.m. subject to BCCI's clearance.

"Since it's an early start, the day will get over by 8-8.30 p.m. The dew factor comes into play mostly after that as we have seen in a white-ball game this time of the year at Eden. Therefore, I don't think dew will be a problem," Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) curator Sujan told IANS on Wednesday.

"We also have arrangements to tackle dew issues like treatment sprays and all that," he said.

The match wicket at the historic ground is expected to assist fast bowlers going by the CAB Super League final in 2016 between Mohun Bagan and Bhowanipore Club which was played under lights and with the pink ball.

Mohammed Shami, representing Mohun Bagan, had snared five wickets in the first innings and finished with a match haul of seven wickets.

Former BCCI chief curator Daljit Singh had said that playing with the pink ball on a normal wicket makes it dirty. So normally, a greater amount of grass is left on the pitch in case of Day-Night pink ball matches. But Mukherjee begged to differ.

"That was not the case when we organised the CAB League final here. The ball was okay. Yes, with the pink ball, it swings more. That is there."

Asked about his preparation and how the pitch is likely to behave, the veteran curator said: "My preparation is the same like I do for any day game. I will make the pitch as sporting as possible. We have had good pitches at Eden in the past and it would be no different. It doesn't change since it's a Day-Night affair."

On Tuesday, the Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB) agreed BCCI's proposal of making the second a second Test between India and Bangladesh, slated to be held from November 22-26, a pink-ball affair.

The decision ended days of speculation after newly elected BCCI President Sourav Ganguly pitched for a Day-Night Test and persuaded BCB to agree despite Bangladesh players not being to keen initially.

"Day-Night Test cricket is a huge step forward and we believe it will bring back the crowd into stadiums and a whole lot of young children to the sport," Ganguly said on Tuesday.

Ganguly met Kohli for the first time since becoming BCCI President at the Cricket Centre in Mumbai last Thursday, and it is believed the former India skipper had a word regarding Day-Night Tests.

The Indian team was earlier not keen on playing Day-Night Tests. India had previously dodged plans to play a pink-ball Test in Adelaide during their tour Down Under last year.

There was also reluctance on India's part when a move to host a Day-Night Test against the West Indies at home was brushed under the carpet.

Ganguly has always backed pink ball Tests, even when he was the head of the BCCI's technical committee in 2016-17. The former India skipper had then recommended that domestic tournaments be played under lights.

India and Bangladesh are the only Full ICC Members apart from Afghanistan and Ireland to have not played a day-night Test yet.